Posts Tagged ‘Broadcast Media’

Who do you think won?

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https://grabyo.com/g/v/lrzGjMJASHe

How Labour Lost The Election in 2015!

It’s only 3 weeks since the Labour party failed to convince the electorate they were ready to be back in government. So much has already been written – by all sides – as to the reasons for their unexpected failure. Some of the analysis has been eloquent and insightful, but much, especially that from the more left-leaning commentators, has been well wide of the mark.

What do they stand for?

What do they stand for?

Here at The Westminster Wing we have been in deep discussion, and to some extent, competition, trying to come up with the most simple, yet precise analysis as to why Labour failed so miserably. This is the result of our group-think in brief.

Since becoming leader of the Labour party, Ed Miliband had always tried to define himself as the righteous envoy of fairness and social justice (whatever that means!) – His soundbites were abundant and lapped up by the broadcast media. – The Bedroom Tax – The Squeezed Middle – The Left-Behind – The Producers Vs The Predators – the list is endless but there were many more long lists, such as the reasons to spend and borrow, the reasons to stop austerity. The list of benefits from immigration etc.

In fact it was Labour’s shortest list that lost them the election in our view, their list of definable policies, where they would take us on the economy, the EU, foreign policy! – They were never able to articulate these policies simply because they didn’t exist. Even when we thought they might be onto something, another MP or shadow minister would simply dismiss it or disown it. Just a month before the election Labour unraveled under scrutiny and with it their dubious credibility on anything.

In short, Labour lost because they spent most of their time telling us what they were against instead of giving us a clear picture of what they would do in government.

If proof were needed, just look at the current leadership contenders struggling to define themselves and their visions for a new-era Labour party – if they can’t do that, what hope can they possibly have of defining the future of the country?

This weekend must rank as one of the worst for the Labour Party in the past 5 years.

The broadcasters have seized on press headlines attacking Ed Milibands leadership qualities (or lack of them) and further compounded his woes by quoting many of his detractors in his own party.

Claims that 50% Labour MPs have given up on the forthcoming General Election and instead are readying themselves for a bloody leadership battle after 7th May are credible.

All eyes are looking left, but at The Westminster Wing we see even larger problems looming for the Tories in the run-up to May’s elections.

Sajid Javid BBC Sunday Politics

Sajid Javid BBC Sunday Politics

On the BBCs Sunday Politics Show today, Secretary of State Sajid Javid gave a creditable performance despite Andrew Neil’s ‘Blue Nun’ fuelled aggressive questioning. Political editor of The Sun: Tom Newton Dunn tweeted..

Our own Sir Trev Skint went further:

But, there are only a handful of humble, Tory MPs possessed of the common touch. The vast majority are elitist,  narcissistic and conceited.

Ed Miliband’s bungling of Labour’s election campaign so far, aided by the Tory press, has given these presumptuous types a false sense of populism. It’s palpable, the British voting public will detect it very soon.

Ed Miliband could be in Downing Street through complacency

Ed Miliband could be in Downing Street through complacency

Yes David Cameron can point to improvements in the economy but, people are not feeling the benefits of these policies,  they take time to filter through.

Have the Tories peaked too soon thanks to Miliband’s ham-fisted,  self inflicted, atrocious start to his campaign? Could the voters turn in favour of the Labour underdogs if a large gap appears in the Tories popularity polling?

David Cameron needs to emulate Sajid Javid’s humble performances to reign-in his party’s over-confidence or there could be a dramitic turn in the polls, leading to Justine Thornton measuring up the curtains in Downing Street.

When Gordon Brown labelled Mrs Duffy  ‘a bigoted woman’ for asking him why his Labour government was allowing foreigners to take British jobs (don’t forget he once claimed ‘British Jobs for British Workers’)  he instantly created around 30 million bigots!  Why wouldn’t our entire working population be concerned about their job being given to an immigrant happy to work for less. Equally,  why wouldn’t the average employer take advantage of cheap immigrant labour if it was available?

The left always label anyone concerned about a threat to our lives or national security as ‘bigots’. It’s their way a shutting down a debate they find uncomfortable!

So when Mathew Richardson said: “I’ve said before, people talk about Ukip being bigots. There are hundreds of thousands of bigots in the United Kingdom and they deserve representation.” He was simply referring to the entire UKIP database.

UKIP supporters manifest themselves in all corners of the political divide. They used to be referred to, benignly, as ‘the silent majority’.

We are all bigots aren't we?

We are all bigots aren’t we?

The man in the pub, the lady in the butchers,  the bigot in the armchair shouting at the TV ‘Alf Garnet style’ – we are all bigots – simply because a bigot is someone who we think is in possession of views someone else   thinks are unfair.

This weekend the press and broadcast media, largely controlled by bigots, have been displaying mass hysteria towards UKIP and Mathew Richardson. However the British public are thinking something completely different, they are seeing a man who understands their bigoted views and relates to them.

 

Over at Iain Dale’s Blog there is a certain amount of sympathy for Labour Shadow Business Secretary Chuka Umunna.

As Iain Dale points out:

I don’t blame him. There was nothing wrong in Murnaghan asking him about the Pickles letter, but to press it in the way he did (and with a bit of a smirk on his face) was rude, smart-arsish and counter productive.

If a guest walks out of an interview, as a interviewer, it’s you who looks bad, not the guest. If that happened to me, I would think I had failed in my job.

Whilst we don’t disagree that Murnaghan was at fault, Umunna could have acted more professionally. He lost his cool and that’s unforgivable from today’s highly media trained politicians.

In effect, both men were out of order, the public is unimpressed by this type of TV experience. Little wonder the viewing figures are down year after year across the UK mainstream media, and no surprise that politicians are seen in such low regard by the majority of voters.