Archive for the ‘Labour Leadership Contest’ Category

Leftwing poster-boy Owen Jones has been busy analysing the success of his Marxist cousins in Spain. He’s smitten with Podemos, the ant-austerity, high tax and spend equivalent of Militant Tendency of the 1980’s lead by trade

Syriza and Podremos Leaders United

Syriza and Podemos Leaders United

unionists and thugs.

Jones has a soft spot for the Podemos leader: Pablo Inglesias! He’s particularly impressed by this section of the Spaniards speech;

So if you’re part of Britain’s battered, bruised and demoralised left, you should listen when Iglesias speaks. Last year, he delivered a speech berating the traditional left’s failure to communicate. Leftwing students never spoke to “normal people”, he said, and treated working-class people as though “they were from another planet”, bewildered that they did not respond in the way Marxist textbooks said they should. The enemy, says Iglesias, “wants us small, speaking in a language no one understands, in a minority, hiding behind our traditional symbols”.

Owen Jones Leftwing Activist

Owen Jones Leftwing Activist

Do you get the irony there? Jones is infamous across Twitter for blocking people with opposing views to his own! Yet he’s advising his comrades to get out and talk to “normal people”! – And what’s more, he thinks it’s a good idea!

We can now draw a safe conclusion, if Owen Jones doesn’t listen to his own advice, why the hell should anyone else?

Read Owen’s Ironic article here.

 

How Labour Lost The Election in 2015!

It’s only 3 weeks since the Labour party failed to convince the electorate they were ready to be back in government. So much has already been written – by all sides – as to the reasons for their unexpected failure. Some of the analysis has been eloquent and insightful, but much, especially that from the more left-leaning commentators, has been well wide of the mark.

What do they stand for?

What do they stand for?

Here at The Westminster Wing we have been in deep discussion, and to some extent, competition, trying to come up with the most simple, yet precise analysis as to why Labour failed so miserably. This is the result of our group-think in brief.

Since becoming leader of the Labour party, Ed Miliband had always tried to define himself as the righteous envoy of fairness and social justice (whatever that means!) – His soundbites were abundant and lapped up by the broadcast media. – The Bedroom Tax – The Squeezed Middle – The Left-Behind – The Producers Vs The Predators – the list is endless but there were many more long lists, such as the reasons to spend and borrow, the reasons to stop austerity. The list of benefits from immigration etc.

In fact it was Labour’s shortest list that lost them the election in our view, their list of definable policies, where they would take us on the economy, the EU, foreign policy! – They were never able to articulate these policies simply because they didn’t exist. Even when we thought they might be onto something, another MP or shadow minister would simply dismiss it or disown it. Just a month before the election Labour unraveled under scrutiny and with it their dubious credibility on anything.

In short, Labour lost because they spent most of their time telling us what they were against instead of giving us a clear picture of what they would do in government.

If proof were needed, just look at the current leadership contenders struggling to define themselves and their visions for a new-era Labour party – if they can’t do that, what hope can they possibly have of defining the future of the country?

After a thrilling General Election, the results shocking even the Conservatives, do the Labour Party have a credible replacement?

Finally, 12 days since the resignation of Ed Miliband the roll-call of candidates is complete. The procrastinations of two leadership hopefuls: Chuka Umunna and Tristran Hunt has left just four potential contenders. But, are Yvette Cooper, Mary Creagh, Liz Kendall and Andy Burnham charismatic and intuitive enough to transform a polarised, resentful 20th century political institution into a relevant, mainstream popular brand that was once associated with the phrase “Cool Britannia”?

Do any of these contenders even aspire to attract such a label, or will they be so engaged in the machinations that come with such a demanding role – their inexperience and lack of gravitas will see them descend into the abyss.

Creagh and Kendall are extremely unlikely to go the distance and will almost certainly have to declare for Cooper or Burnham, and there lies the problem. The two remaining candidates have so much baggage they would make Madonna on a world tour look like a backpacker! Burnham is toxic in the eyes of many of the electorate for his shambolic running of the NHS – under his watch there were many avoidable deaths – the Mid-Staffs scandal sticks to Burnham like Liam Byrne’s treasury note, and look how that was used to great effect by Cameron in the short campaign. Burnham – should he become leader, Burnham would quickly come to dread the weekly mauling at PMQs – he would never be able to weaponise the NHS to the same effect as Miliband did. In fact, I would be very surprised if he ever uttered the acronym. That leaves him with a limited attack, especially when you consider he was never seen as a friend of business and finance, so the economy is off topic for him. With Rachel Reeves writing his economic policies they are certain to be weak and muddled. He is unlikely to fare much better on defence, education, homeland security or foreign policy too. In short, he is continuity Miliband in every way.

Labour Leadership Contenders

Where is the real leader?

We now turn our attention to Yvette Cooper, yes the thrusting, ambitious Mrs Balls. Her most notable trait being insincerity. If you don’t believe me, just check-out twitter when she appears on a political discussion program, you’ll see what I mean and fully understand why, as Labour leader, she would contaminate the whole party brand. This would put her majesty’s loyal opposition at a distinct disadvantage from the get-go! On the economy she will be accused of advancing her husbands totally discredited fiscal platitudes. Education would be no better, Mr Balls was schools minister in the last government and that didn’t go too well, Cooper will again be seen as reconstituting Ed Balls’ failed education strategies. Her defence and foreign policy will be associated with Ed Miliband’s disastrous, selfish U-turns on Syria and Lybia.  Ms Cooper was of course shadow home secretary, her tenure has been overshadowed by Teresa May, who has been decisive and strong, especially with the Police Federation, we couldn’t possibly expect that from a Labour Home Secretary.

Without really thinking too strenuously, there is an entire nuclear arsenal available to the Tories should they wish to attack a Labour party led by either of these to candidates. Yet if Kendall or Creagh were to surprise us all and one of them become Labour leader, the credibility factor would take years to build around them, just as it did with Ed Miliband, and of course, there is the danger, just like Miliband, that the public may not like them at all.